Saturday, June 30, 2012

Clay Cooper's Country Music Express

This evening I headed over to the Clay Cooper Theatre on Highway 76 in Branson to take in the 8 p.m. performance of Clay Cooper's Country Music Express.


The star of the show is a good-looking Texan, born and raised in the small town of Wylie. He grew up singing in the Wylie Baptist Church, where his mom played the piano, and loved being able to share his gift of music. 


Cooper came to Branson at the age of 16 — as part of a kids band, the Texas Goldminors. He stayed and became a town favorite, performing at many of the popular venues. He is now celebrating the 24th season of Clay Cooper's Country Music Express.


Tonight, Cooper shared the stage with a dozen or so other performers, including his wife, Tina, for the two-hour, high-energy, fast-paced country music variety show. The show featured hilarious comedy throughout and lots of great singing and dancing - the kind that inspired us in the audience to - continuously - tap our feet and clap our hands! And, at times, literally hoot and holler! 


Cooper has a great personality, and he enjoys people. Frequently, he jumps offstage and interacts with the audience, shaking hands and asking questions. Tonight, an older, married couple got lots of his attention. 


Joyce was celebrating her 80th birthday and excited about it. Her husband, Gus, teased about being married "too long" when Cooper asked about the length of their marriage. From there, the banter went back and forth. The good humor of the couple was greatly appreciated by all, but most especially by Cooper who could not have chosen a better duo to "pick" on!


A bit later, the band began to play and Cooper started singing a love song. I was enjoying it thoroughly until, all of a sudden, Cooper walked directly over to me, grabbed my hand and pulled me out on the floor to dance with him! 


I love to dance, so I really didn't mind it at all. In fact, the cheek-to-cheek stuff was fun, and Cooper's cologne was nice! If he hadn't been singing tenderly into my right ear, I would have told him so. 


Instead, I'll simply say it here, "Thanks, Clay!"


































Clay shares the stage with 20 veteran cast members in a high energy, country music variety show guaranteed to make you tap your toes, stomp your feet, and even let out a holler or two!  Don’t miss New York’s number one cowboy, trick roper, and gun-slinger, Johnny Lonestar; eight amazing dancers lead by Clay’s multi-talented wife, Tina Cooper, a six-piece band, Branson’s funnier than funny comedian, Matt Gumm, 6 year old rising star Colt Cooper, and Clay’s newest addition to his cast, Buckets ‘n’ Boards, a dynamic rhythm duo that will make you laugh till you cry!  Clay Cooper’s Country Music Express is great for all ages 2- 92. The unbelievable talent, hysterical comedy, and down-home   personality bring our guests back time and time again.


Clay shares the stage with 20 veteran cast members in a high energy, country music variety show guaranteed to make you tap your toes, stomp your feet, and even let out a holler or two!  Don’t miss New York’s number one cowboy, trick roper, and gun-slinger, Johnny Lonestar; eight amazing dancers lead by Clay’s multi-talented wife, Tina Cooper, a six-piece band, Branson’s funnier than funny comedian, Matt Gumm, 6 year old rising star Colt Cooper, and Clay’s newest addition to his cast, Buckets ‘n’ Boards, a dynamic rhythm duo that will make you laugh till you cry!  Clay Cooper’s Country Music Express is great for all ages 2- 92. The unbelievable talent, hysterical comedy, and down-home   personality bring our guests back time and time again.

Andy Williams' Moon River Grill

When visiting Branson, schedules are often full, and finding time for a long, leisurely dinner is difficult.


This was the situation my friend and I found ourselves in tonight. We had seen the epic show, Joseph, at the Sight and Sound Theatre this afternoon and were taking in Clay Cooper's Country Music Express this evening. In between the two was just enough time to drive to Andy Williams' Moon River Grill and hope for good food and speedy service. We got both but missed not having more time to sit back, relax and enjoy this very cool spot. 


The restaurant is large, with four dining rooms and a generous bar area. The interior design is reminiscent of the 1960s. On the walls are displays of Andy Warhol-like art and pieces from Williams' personal collection, including framed gold records, photos of the star, etc. 


Andy Williams' Moon River Grill routinely features live music. Tonight, we were entertained by a talented artist at the piano. His selections were hits from the 60s - by Williams and some of his buddies. Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., etc. Loved it!


Many of the entrees featured on the menu are Williams' mother's recipes. I ordered her meatloaf, and I could not  have been happier. It was spicy and delicious and came with sides of mashed potatoes and green beans — foods that always comfort me!


Our waiter told us Andy Williams lives in Branson about nine months of the year. He pointed out  "Andy's Reserved Table" in one of the main dining rooms and told us Williams pops in frequently for dinner and to visit with his patrons. He said it would not surprise him one little bit if Williams showed up this very night!


If it had not been for plans already made and tickets purchased, I would have enjoyed sitting there for a couple of hours - just in case the main man showed up. I would have loved to meet him, tell him how much I've always enjoyed his music, how much I appreciated the opportunity to dine at the Moon River Grill and see for myself what others are always raving about!

















The Moon River Grill...The hippest place in Branson...Where California chic meets 60's cool!
Become immersed in the 60's with the atmosphere and four separate dining areas...plus pictures of Andy and his friends and his personal collection of art displayed throughout the restaurant!

It's the coolest place in Branson to hang out and enjoy some great food!
Whether it's the outstanding selection of entrees...many from Andy's Mother's recipes...or the great salads and sandwiches...The Moon River Grill offers some of the best food in Branson at prices you'll love! And don't forget about all of the delectable desserts that are created daily by the in-house pastry chef.

Or just hang out with Andy's original gold record in the bar area. The Moon River Grill is the place to be each night with drink specials and live entertainment.



me out at Night!

The Moon River Grill...The hippest place in Branson...Where California chic meets 60's cool!
Become immersed in the 60's with the atmosphere and four separate dining areas...plus pictures of Andy and his friends and his personal collection of art displayed throughout the restaurant!

It's the coolest place in Branson to hang out and enjoy some great food!
Whether it's the outstanding selection of entrees...many from Andy's Mother's recipes...or the great salads and sandwiches...The Moon River Grill offers some of the best food in Branson at prices you'll love! And don't forget about all of the delectable desserts that are created daily by the in-house pastry chef.

Or just hang out with Andy's original gold record in the bar area. The Moon River Grill is the place to be each night with drink specials and live entertainment.














Joseph



Being able to see this afternoon's epic musical performance of Joseph at Branson's larger-than-life Sight and Sound Theatre was an experience I will long remember - and treasure!

Joseph tells the 4,000-year-old biblical story of a boy who triumphed over incredible adversity - including the betrayal of his brothers - with the grace and mercy of God. Joseph's inspirational journey is full of twists and turns and as colorful as Joseph's famous coat. The message of integrity and forgiveness to heal broken relationships and reunite families is relevant today - and powerfully told in Josephas evidenced by the tear-filled eyes of those of us in the audience.

Joseph features stage performances by 40 actors and dozens of live and exotic animals, teamed with brilliant costumes and Egyptian stage designs, heart-warming musical scores and fabulously choreographed dance numbers. 

The Sight and Sound Theatre in Branson was the perfect setting for a show of this caliber. The 20,000-square-foot stage accommodates sets up to 40 feet tall and boasts state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems, pyrotechnics capabilities, impressive special effects including 3D video imaging. To call this theatre incredible, would be an understatement.

Seeing Joseph is a life-changing experience - the kind you'll welcome and appreciate!

Note: Sight and Sound Theatres is a for-profit ministry that operates without charitable support. Performances of "Joseph" will continue in Branson through December 29, 2012. 





Silver Dollar City

My friend and I arrived at Silver Dollar City about 11 o'clock this morning. And, despite the bright sun and temps nearing 100 degrees, we ventured with gusto into the rustic, Ozark Mountain theme park.


Like all visitors, we entered the park through the Hospitality Center where, amidst the displays of souvenirs, is the entrance to one of nature's greatest wonders - Marvel Cave. This is fitting because Silver Dollar City evolved around this gigantic hole in the earth.


In 1894, Canadian entrepreneur William Henry Lynch and his two daughters, Miriam and Genevieve, opened the cave as an Ozarks tourist attraction. It remained so for over 50 years. 


Then, in 1950, Hugo Herschend, a Danish immigrant from Chicago, leased the cave. Ten years later, the Herschends opened the 1880s theme park.


When visiting Silver Dollar City, a tour of Marvel Cave is included with your ticket. Tours depart approximately every half hour. 


Marvel Cave is a wet limestone cave, complete with formations that are still alive and growing! 


Powder Keg
Visitors to the cave travel 300 feet below the surface and enter the breathtakingly beautiful Cathedral Room, the largest cave entrance in the United States. The tour lasts about 60 minutes, with most of that time spent climbing nearly 600 stairs. Along the way, a trained cave guide provides interesting and entertaining anecdotes of historical or geographical importance. After the tour, a unique cable train takes cave visitors back up the half-mile, 1070-foot climb back to the surface.
Frisco Silver Dollar Steam Line


After a visit to Marvel Cave, theme park goers will be ready for some rest and refreshment, and Silver Dollar City has a dozen wonderful options. Near the Hospitality Center (and the cave), for example, is a favorite spot of mine - a bakery offering tasty snacks and sandwiches. The place features an open kitchen where patrons are able to watch the bakers do their thing.




Silver Dollar City features shaded pathways that lead to specialty shops, entertainment stages, thrill rides and other seasonal attractions.


I passed on a ride on the Powder Keg, the park's sky-high roller coaster, but I did enjoy a 20-minute train ride on the Frisco Silver Dollar Steam Line. It ran around the theme park and through the Ozark forestlands. Along the way, I noticed several new-construction sites. Though mum's the word when it comes to these coming attractions, I did learn one will be home to a giant woody, an old-fashioned wooden roller coaster. It's expected to be ready for riders by September. 


I had a great time at Silver Dollar City, and I would like to return later this year to check out that new woody. But, as with the Powder Keg, I will look and report. It's hard to take notes while screaming!



























McFarlain's Rising Table


I was invited to have breakfast this morning at McFarlain's Family Restaurant, located in the IMAX Entertainment Complex, 3562 Shepherd of the Hills Expressway, in Branson, MO. Also invited was my friend, Richard, another Houston-based travel writer.


We got there just before 10 a.m., and were warmly welcomed by the restaurant's general manager. He led us to a large round table in the center of the main dining room, instead of one of the smaller tables that lined the walls. 


Richard and I thought this was odd. We commented on it to each other but said nothing to our hosts - fearing we would offend, appear rude or be viewed as critical city slickers!


We both noticed and appreciated McFarlain's unique country decor. The place is jam-packed with hundreds of antiques, original works of art and photographs.  


Rich and I chatted a bit about the day's agenda. Then an adorable young waitress walked over to take our order. As you might guess, we ordered big and hearty breakfasts - Eggs Benedict, hash browns and grits, bacon and sausage, biscuits and gravy and, of course, lots of freshly squeezed orange juice and hot coffee.




About 10 minutes later, the food arrived and distracted us from further conversation. Instead, we focused on our plates and the Ozarks-inspired cuisine in front of us. 


We had been eating for awhile when, all of a sudden, Richard looked over at me and asked: "Does this table seem high to you?" Only then, did I realize that, indeed, it did. In fact, it was now very high; the top of it was nearly up to our chins!




Clearly, the height of the table had risen since we first sat down. But how?




Just then, the general manager and our waitress, smiling from ear to ear, returned to our table. Yes, we had, deliberately, been seated at McFarlain's infamous Rising Table!


We learned about the table's hydraulic lift that allows it to rise so slowly patrons sitting there remain unaware of the changes. We learned of the switch on the wall that was turned on by staff just as the food is served.


We also learned the other diners (sitting at normal tables in the surrounding area) were told to observe the rising table and the people eating there. They were instructed by the servers, "Don't tell them what is happening!" 




So, as you can imagine, the other diners couldn't help but stare and laugh at us for "no apparent reason!"


But, being the newest victims of McFarlain's Rising Table wasn't all bad. Soon enough the table was slowly lowered, and we were able to thoroughly enjoy the rest of our meal. 


Additionally, we became the newest members of the McFarlain's Rising Table Society. We were also given certificates to prove it!
















 

Friday, June 29, 2012

Florentina's Ristorante


It's my first night in Branson, and first on the agenda was dinner at Florentina's Ristorante Italiano for me and Richard, a friend and fellow travel writer, and Andy, our host. 
Recipes here are created in the old-world tradition of Italy by Chef Ron Kalenuik, author of 18 cookbooks and host of a number of television shows. Chef K, as he is affectionately known, has crafted a great menu that includes homemade sauces, signature dishes made fresh daily and authentic brick oven pizzas.
Among the house specialties was a great selection of pasta dishes, including spaghetti marinara and bolognese, capellini vongole, lasagna, linguini del mare, penne alla vodka and penne arrabbiate.
I opted for the lasagna; which came highly recommended. Happy to report, It exceeded high expectations. 
Dino's 24 Karrot Cake, the talk of the town, is offered at Florentina's, so the three of us finished our meals with a (shared) serving of that too. The cake is made here in Branson by Dino's 24 Karrot Cake Company. Dino is an international, award-winning pianist. His bakery is nationally known, and many celebrities - including Denzel Washington and The Rev. Billy Graham -  are among Dino's frequent customers.
Florentina's decor is warm and inviting; it is perfect for intimate dinners for two or for groups wanting to eat "family style." Prices are reasonable; and serving portions are generous. Staffers are some of the friendliest I've ever encountered! 
Florentina's Ristorante Italiano is located in Branson, Missouri, at 2690 Green Mountain Drive. 

Branson Airport



For years I had heard about Branson and, for years, I had been planning to travel there and check it out. A couple of months ago, the perfect opportunity to travel to Branson presented itself. 

I received an invitation from the owners of the Branson Airport (BKG) to participate in a three-day FAM (familiarization) trip. They were eager for me (a member of the press)  to experience the ease of getting there to Branson - via AirTran Airways' daily non-stop flights in and out of Hobby Airport! 

Before I knew it, dates were selected and flights arranged. I would depart Houston on June 29 - today - at 3:44 p.m. And, so I did!

I arrived at the Branson Airport about 5 p.m. I was met by Andy Parks, the airport's marketing coordinator. Soon enough, this handsome young man taught me a whole lot about the Branson Airport. 

Located in the heart of the Ozarks, it is the first privately developed and operated commercial service airport in the United States; it opened its doors in May 2009.

The Branson Airport is currently serviced by AirTran Airways, Frontier Airlines and Branson AirExpress, but additional carriers and destinations are on the horizon. Non-stop service is currently available between Branson and Atlanta, Austin, Baltimore/Washington, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Nashville and Orlando, 

The terminal of the Branson Airport is a small and precious gem. It's decor is rustic and charming and provides an appropriately warm welcome to The Ozarks. 


Go; see for yourself! 

For more information on Branson Airport and its subsidiaries, please visit FlyBranson.com.

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Sunday Brunch at Bistro Alex

Alex Brennan-Martin, trained at the prestigious La Varrene culinary arts school in Paris, always wanted to open an elegant bistro where simplicity and serenity ruled.


He realized that dream in 2009 when he opened Bistro Alex in upscale Hotel Sorella on Houston's west side.


The restaurant follows in the footsteps of Brennan's of Houston, where the cuisine is impressive and the service impeccable. It is a nice addition to the Brennan's restaurant dynasty, which started in 1987 in New Orleans with the opening of Commander's Palace. Like others in the "family," Bistro Alex delivers a memorable dining experience.


My son and I were reminded of this earlier today when we stopped in at Bistro Alex for brunch. Our plan was to enjoy a long and leisurely meal, ordering several courses and specialty items, including a couple of the bottomless Mimosas (featured each Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.).


Julia, our server, greeted us with a basket of breakfast breads and a pot of hot coffee; she encouraged us to look at the menus and ask questions if we had any. 


Without hesitation, Matt ordered Brennan's Turtle Soup, while I quickly decided on the Gumbo Ya Ya. Both proved to be great starters - palate-pleasing good!


Next, we shared the Five-Tomato Salad and loved the mix of roma, grape, teardrop, cherry and beefsteak tomatoes, animal farm arugula and shaved sweet onion. The dressing - made with 25-year-old balsamic - was simple and terrific. 


We probably should have stopped right there and called it a "very good meal," but we didn't. Instead, Matt ordered Bistro Alex's Shrimp and Grits and I ordered the Creole Omelette. 


The Shrimp and Grits featured roasted jalapeno andouille grits, blue heron goat cheese and spicy shrimp veloute. Between bites he kept reminding me how good it was! Finally, I took a couple of bites and agreed wholeheartedly!


The Creole Omelette was composed of some of my favorite ingredients, including andouille sausage, tasso ham, grilled onions and manchago. There was just the right amount of each and topped with a three-mustard glaze. Yummy and nutritious!


Afterwards, we really had no room left for dessert, but Julia, our ever-so-helpful server, insisted we indulge ourselves further. She brought out a large portion of the White Chocolate Bread Pudding to tempt us. And, of course, it did!


Matt and I are looking forward to going back to Bistro Alex for brunch soon. We;re getting a multi-generational group of friends together and returning in July - when Sunday Brunch at Bistro Alex will add live jazz to its memorable offerings!


Can't wait!


Note: Bistro Alex is located at 800 W. Sam Houston Parkway in CityCentre. Reservations are recommended and can be made by calling 713-827-3545. 



















Friday, June 22, 2012

Public Dress

Youth on Wall, Jarrow, Tyneside, UK
Photograph by Chris Kiillip, English, 1976
A new photography exhibition just opened at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston and, today, I was among the first to check it out. 


About noon, I headed over to the Caroline Weiss Law Building, and with the help of a MFAH staffer, found the small exhibition on the wall of the Lower Brown Corridor. 


Entitled, Public Dress, the photos show how many 20th century photographers have relied on clothing to craft a social narrative. The photos highlight the relationship between photography and everyday dress.


The photos of Maripol and Andrew Burmeister, for example, feature casual scenes with high-fashion in mind. This results in a gritty, relaxed style — seen today in social media and fashion blogs.


Robert Frank, Dan Wiener and Geoff Winningham inspected the expressive qualities of their subjects’ choices of attire, even of those in uniform. 


Personal style can also be seen as an act of rebellion, such as the "contained aggression" of a pair of boots seen in another by Chris Killip. 


The photographs by Will van Overbeek, Janice Rubin and Carl Clark explore how people groom themselves for a special occasion. 


One photo - the rear view of two women, clad in shiny lame pants and watching the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo - was a personal favorite!


Public Dress is a selection of photographs from MFAH's collection. I found it interesting to see the names of the original owners of the photographs. Some were well-known locals who had either given or loaned the photos to the museum.


Hats off to Natalie Zelt, MFAH Curatorial Assistant, who organized this gem of an exhibition. It's a treasure, and I'm very glad I discovered it.




















Sunday, June 17, 2012

Red Hot Patriot

Earlier this evening I drove over to Main Street Theater in Chelsea Square to take in a performance of Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins.


The one-act play tells the funny, down-to-earth story of Texan Molly Ivins, the famously brassy newspaper columnist and best-selling author.


Ivins, a true Lone Star original, was best known for her height, rusty red hair and sharp-tongued wit, which most often stuck it to our state and national politicians and the "good ol' boys." 


Ivins was the one who gave George W. Bush the nickname, Shrub. Admittedly, I've never forgiven her for that!


Ivins was also known for always telling the truth - at least the way she saw it. Her lens, of course, was that of a Liberal Democrat. She hated war and loved civil rights. She wrote often about both and could be counted among those who put her money were her mouth was. She was a huge supporter of the American Civil Liberties Union and did much to help start and support chapters throughout the country. 


Ivins was portrayed by actress Sara Gaston, well known to Houston audiences who frequent the Alley Theatre and MST. Gaston did a good job of capturing the essence of Ivins, though I don't think anyone could ever be as comfortable spitting out the four-letter words or throwing jabs as easily as Ivins herself. 


Ivins succumbed to breast cancer at the age of 62. The play addresses her battle with the disease too (blaming herself for not paying attention to her health) and the legacy she wanted to leave (encouraging us all to be active and informed citizens). 


Red Hot Patriot celebrates Ivins' courage and tenacity. It was written by twin sisters Margaret Engel and Allison Engel, themselves long-time journalists. I know Ivins' would have liked and appreciated that!









Friday, June 15, 2012

The Mad Potter

Earlier tonight I met two friends — Karen and Nikki — at The Mad Potter in River Oaks. Plans were to spend a few leisurely hours painting pottery.


Tonight's visit was my second since the first of the year. The last time I went to The Mad Potter, I was there for hours — but only because I spent more than 90 minutes trying to decide exactly what I would paint. The choices were endless, and I was clueless. 


Meredith McCord
There were bowls, cups, glasses, jars, pitchers, teapots, trays and, of course, figurines of all shapes and sizes and for all seasons. I liked many of the pieces, but most important to me was settling on something I could really use! 


I chose a medium-sized bowl that could be placed on a small conference table in my office. I knew I could fill it with a large bag of hard candy, and it would be appreciated by all who came near it.


Having a place and purpose for this bowl made the next step - picking the colors - easy. The bowl would have to be fit with the decor. It would have to be painted black and red. It was, and it turned out great! I really love it!


Tonight, I painted a small, contemporary pitcher in a solid color - in what is probably best described as speckled apple green. I chose this piece because I collect glazed pitchers, the color because I own nothing like it. 


Because I chose a relatively small piece, and had to be apply just three coats of paint, the process was quick and easy. After about an hour, I was sitting back and watching the others, all the while nibbling on the munchies brought in by Nikki and sipping on a cold beverage bought in the shop.


The story of The Mad Potter would make a good story for Houston Woman Magazine. It is owned by Houstonian Meredith McCord. She left a corporate real estate development job in search of a career in a more creative field. 


McCord had studied business and art at Vanderbilt University, and now she's using the knowledge of both to run a successful business that she and her customers just love!

















Thursday, June 14, 2012

WWW and The Paris Wife

Gathering with good friends for any reason is always fun, but the monthly meeting of the Wine, Women and Words Book Club is, for me, always a treat. Our meeting tonight was no exception. In fact, it was extra special.

We met at Liz's home on the west side of Houston for dinner and discussion of Paula McLain's book, The Paris Wife. 

Upon arrival, we were delighted to find French wine and cheese lying in wait. At dinner we enjoyed a delightful menu, prepared from recipes straight from the pages of this book of the month - a bountiful salad, a hearty sausage and chicken cassoulet and, for dessert, a beautiful and yummy fruit tart. 

While enjoying it all, we discussed The Paris Wife. 

The book is an evocative story of ambition and betrayal. It captures Paris in the 1920s and the love affair between Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley. 

The couple meet in Chicago, and following a whirlwind courtship and wedding, set sail for Paris. There, they became part of a lively group of expatriates that included F. Scott and  Zelda Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein.

The book is written in the voice of Hadley, so becoming sympathetic to her comes easily. And, this was reflected in the discussions about the table tonight. 

We talked about Hadley's role as the wife of an artist, and a man like Hemingway. We talked about how she financially supported him as he pursued his dream. We questioned why he never mentioned her in books written while they were together - though a mistress was. We talked about other aspects of their life together - and, finally, Hemingway's tragic death. 

Finally, someone asked: Would any woman of sound mind really want to be married to a man like Hemingway?  A man driven by ambition above all else? 

 In unison, we all agreed, "No! Absolutely not!"











Flag Day


Every rainless morning, I post the American flag on an outside wall of my home. Doing so is always a special pleasure, but today -  Flag Day - it takes on unique significance. 

Flag Day commemorates the adoption of the American flag by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. 

The original U.S. flag featured 13 stripes,  representing the 13 colonies, and 13 white stars in a blue field, signifying a new constellation.

Previously, in 1776, George Washington and members of the "flag committee" called on Betsy Ross at her home in Philadelphia. At the time, Ross was a young widow, known for her sewing skills and engaged in the business of flag making. The committee asked her to make a flag design from a rough drawing showed to her by Washington.



Ross noticed the drawing featured six-pointed stars and informed the committee that a five-pointed star would be correct. With a single clip of her scissors, she displayed a true, symmetrical, five-pointed star, convincing the committee to "do it her way."

After that, the committee left the rough design with Ross but gave her permission to make a sample flag according to her own ideas for the arrangement of the stars and the proportions of the strips.

After the original flag was completed, it was presented to Congress for approval. It was the "flag committee" members who informed Ross that her flag had been accepted as the nation's standard.

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day. In 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress.


I did bit of research to find out if there was an official Flag Day event going on in Houston today. Sadly, I didn't find out. Perhaps next year?

Even so, I have no doubt lots of Houstonians will be flying their flags today, and the city will be awash in red, white and blue.